motivation monday: hope as an action verb

by Barb on March 18, 2013

Thanks for visiting! Never miss a post again! If you love reading my posts, you can subscribe and have new ones delivered straight to your inbox.

Sign up now for my Semi-weekly Newsletter (with freebies)

Disclosure: If you make a purchase using a link on this page, I may earn a commission, and I am very grateful for your support of this site. Thank you. (Read all the fine print here.)

Hope is an Action Verb

This past weekend, one of my sister-in-laws gave me a book called Making Hope Happen: Create the Future You Want for Yourself and Others by Dr. Shane Lopez. I’m not finished the book; there’s a lot of meat to it. However, I have found it so fascinating that I had to share what I’ve read so far.

Hopeful people share core beliefs that sustain them even when life seems like an uphill battle.

  • They believe the future will be better than the current situation.
  • They believe they have the power to change things.
  • They believe there is no one path to a goal.
  • They believe all paths have obstacles.

Hopeful people are resourceful, practical, realistic, and resilient. While you can believe you can change your own life, if you don’t see obstacles as learning experiences, you may fizzle out while pursuing your goals. If one door closes in your life and you don’t see the other doors opening even if they’re right in front of you, you won’t be flexible enough to go down the new path to your goal. All 4 beliefs need to work together.

Hope has never been a word in my vocabulary. Honestly, I find it difficult to wrap my mind around the concept. Yet, I understand the core beliefs in a hopeful person, and I see them in myself especially in the past few years. I always have the feeling wherever I go that I will meet friends in strangers. I will learn something new almost every day. I’m not afraid of stretching myself and trying new things. I’m more flexible; I find myself in the role of facilitator/leader more often.

Do I have a goal? My goal, somewhat nebulously, is to earn money writing and maybe even taking pictures. I want to get out and explore. I want to incite curiosity in my kids and get them exploring and experimenting.

I’d love to hear what you think in the comments. Are you a hopeful person? Where does your feeling of hope come from?

Motivation Monday

We will come by and visit sometime this week; we will pin or tweet posts out so we can all get a little bit more exposure for all of our hard work!!



Because I love meeting new people and sharing, this post is linked to:

Monday’s Musings, Mom Initative, Mama Moments Monday, The Gathering Spot

Disclosure: To help pay for running this blog, I am an Amazon Associate.

Meet Barb

Barb Hoyer has written 3719 posts.

After working in the fundraising world for over ten years, Barb is an avid runner, writer, photographer, parent volunteer, and lover of dictionaries and thesauruses. Wife to an engineer and mom to 5 kids, Barb lives in the suburbs of Philly. Her idea of relaxation is an afternoon on the couch with a stack of books.

VigLink badge

Thanks for visiting! Never miss a post again! If you love reading my posts, you can subscribe and have new ones delivered straight to your inbox.

Sign up now for my Semi-weekly Newsletter (with freebies)


Instagram

Comments on this entry are closed.

Lauryn March 18, 2013 at 7:39 am

Such and interesting way to define hope. I am sure it is an extremely thought-provoking book. I would consider myself a hopeful person by those points however, I have a lot to work on when it comes to being realistic and practical at all times:)
Lauryn recently posted..Things I Want My Daughter to Know – Friends {Motivation Monday}

Diane Balch March 18, 2013 at 8:22 am

Hi Barb,
I’m by nature hopeful. I think it is a coping tool. I also think it is a combination of nature and nurture. As a parent I always tell about my failures and what I did to cope. I hoping that this is teaching my kids that all failures are a learning opportunity not a dead end.
Diane Balch recently posted..Healthy Eating: New Study Overwelming: Mediterranean Diet Reduces Heart Disease

Barb March 19, 2013 at 9:55 am

I’m always reminded of something Thomas Edison said about finding 1,000 ways not to make a lightbulb.

I’m working with my 2nd son right now. He gets frustrated easily and then gets stuck. His report card came home yesterday, and was fabulous, yet, I was upset that he didn’t get recognized for his improvement by his teacher. So, we talked about it and what I valued as important. My first reaction was this is a kid that will struggle with this, and then I realized maybe he was meant to struggle with this for a later reason.

Little Sis March 18, 2013 at 9:18 am

Thanks so much for hosting Barb! Hope you have a super week!
Little Sis recently posted..SOTW: Crock Pot Creamed Lentil Soup

kim @ DESIGN + LIFE + KIDS March 18, 2013 at 9:20 am

Thanks for sharing!
When I was younger I wasn’t as hopeful of a person as I am now. I think maturity and having kids made that happen for me. I try to encourage myself and my girls that life goes on and we should enjoy each day without regret. And I can safely say that I don’t regret anything. Do I wish I didn’t do a few things… sure, but they’ve helped mold me into who I am today!
kim @ DESIGN + LIFE + KIDS recently posted..COOKING WITH KIDS 17: st. patrick’s day 2013

Heather S. March 18, 2013 at 9:36 am

I would consider myself a pretty hopeful person, but I think it can bite me sometimes, too, because I want to see the good in everyone as well. Sounds like an interesting book!
Heather S. recently posted..Pirate and Mermaid Party Food Ideas

Barb March 19, 2013 at 9:51 am

I hear you! It can be a struggle sometimes which is where I think the tolerance comes in mentioned by Renee.

Jo @ Jo's Health Corner March 18, 2013 at 3:04 pm

It sounds like an interesting book. I am a pretty hopeful person and I try to stay positive. Essential oils have been of great help for me when needed..

Thanks for hosting!
Jo @ Jo’s Health Corner recently posted..Classic Creamy Cole Slaw for the Season’s First BBQ

Nicole March 18, 2013 at 3:40 pm

I think I’m a hopeful person. I seem to be the kind of optimist that people want to smack often. :)

Barb March 19, 2013 at 9:50 am

LOL!

renee March 18, 2013 at 7:18 pm

Oh Barb–this is good. I spend a LOT of time with kids who learn differently and I love trying to figure out way for them to “get it” in their own way that makes sense to them. Of course it doesn’t fit into a nice little package like typical kids but I’m ok with that.

I wish more people would have the tolerance that you have!

Be Blessed.
renee recently posted..Joyful Vlog

Barb March 19, 2013 at 9:50 am

Thank you! It’s a hard won tolerance. Maybe I’ll write about it someday.

I love that you work with kids that learn differently! They can teach us so much about learning and being.

Trina Peruski O'Boyle March 18, 2013 at 8:24 pm

I find my hope within my faith and growing up within a family that always felt the glass was half full than half empty. This would be a perfect book for my mom and dad. My mom is battling Lung Cancer and we can use all the HOPE we can get.
Trina Peruski O’Boyle recently posted..O’Boy! It’s the Weekly Meal Plan

Barb March 19, 2013 at 9:48 am

My prayers are with you, your mom, and your family. The book starts off with the story of a man faced with kidney issues who lost hope and then found it again.

I don’t think my mom ever lost hope which something she passed on to myself and my sister. She struggled with some stuff, and yet, I always felt like she would do what it took to get something done. Even now, she’s struggling with her back and arthritis yet you would never see it from her attitude.

Previous post:

Next post: